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SUPPLEMENT 5
PROTO-BULGARIAN RUNIC INSCRIPTION FROM THE TERRITORY OF FORMER KUBRAT BULGARIA AND FROM IMEON (PAMIR)

1. 
One of the regal inscriptions from the territory of the Kubrat Bulgaria. Six out of the seven characters it contains are also found in Proto-Bulgarian inscriptions from Bulgaria. At the end of the inscription one reads clearly the word KAN - a quite typical Proto-Bulgarian title.
Publications: Acad. G.F. Turchaninov. Monuments of the writing and language of the peoples of the north Caucasus and Eastern Europe ", 1971, Tab. 27-35.

2. 
All characters in this inscription have counterparts in Murfatlar and Pliska.

3. 
One of the large inscriptions discovered in Sarkel at the Don river. It documents the first occurrence of a character resembling the modern Bulgarian SHT () and is possibly its prototype.

4. 
Inscription whose character for the letter B resembles the later Glagolic B. This character as well as the rest ones have their counterparts in Pliska and Murfatlar.

5. 
The third character of this inscription is most interesting as it is frequently found in the sacred Proto-Bulgarian inscriptions in Pliska, in the village of Dlazhko (near Shumen) and in other places. In Dlazhko this character occurs between the lines, together with other Proto-Bulgarian sacred symbols.

6. 
The inscription was discovered on a stone weight for spindle from the former Kubrat Bulgaria. It is the first occurrence of the prototype of the letter ZH (), which later also appears in one of the versions of the Cyrillic alphabet.

7. 
All characters of this inscription are also found in Proto-Bulgarian inscriptions from Bulgaria.

8. 
The second character of this inscription is most interesting. It is found both in Murfatlar and in Caucasus, into an inscription from the Humarin ruins. The first character is also quite characteristic - it appears on the treasure from Nagy Saint Miklos, in Murfatlar and even in some early Cyrillic inscriptions.

9. 
Also in this inscription one can read the word KAN in the second line, which is a proof for its close relationship with Proto-Bulgarian language and culture.

10. 
In contrast to the previous examples, this inscription only partly resembles the Proto-Bulgarian ones. It can be assumed that it do not belong to the Proto-Bulgarians but to some neighbouring people.

11. 
This is the oldest known to science runic inscription with characters of Proto-Bulgarian type. A special feature is that the letters had been written much more askew than it was done later. But what concerns the form of the letters, this very archaic inscription from the VIII-IX c. BC, differs in almost nothing from the later Proto-Bulgarian inscriptions.

12. 
In this inscription on a bronze head of an arrow can be read without difficulties the word BOS or BUS, which has counterparts in some eastern languages until present - for example in Chuvash. It also resembles the Bulgarian word BOD (prick) and also the word BUCHA (to punch, to pierce through). The word BOS or BUS was scratched exactly on a point of an arrow. A special feature of the inscription is that the second letter, met also in some Proto-Bulgarian inscriptions from Ravna is that it is written very aslant (at about 45°).

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